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Updated about 5hrs ago

  • Food
  • 70% Complete (success)
  • Service
  • 70% Complete (success)
  • Decor
  • 70% Complete (success)

I may not be a fan of Yo China: it is a project that has outlived its use and hardly caters to the tastes (and price points) of today. The latest offering from the same stable is dimsumbros. And that is something that is all set to rock the NCR. A single restaurant has cleverly made two sections, each one invisible from the other. In the middle is an effective partition: a dim sum kitchen on one side and a bar on the other. I visited the dim sum section and was completely overwhelmed at two things. One is the quality and sheer range of the dim sum on offer, the other at the price.

It takes a certain sort of genius to serve 37 varieties of premium, baked, steamed and fried dim sum at rock-bottom prices in a mall. This means that the clientele inevitably consists of those who have never encountered say, a radish cake or a custard bun. Thus, the idea has to be explained to them by the painstakingly trained staff. Do be warned that you'll get ticked off (in the politest way, to be sure) if you mismatch your sauce and dim sum! It's all for a good cause. You can opt for four, six or eight baskets of dim sum per meal, each basket containing three pieces. Eight baskets (Rs 950/1,250 veg/non-veg) will get you two baskets from the premium section plus any other permutation; four baskets (Rs 550/750) will get you no premium dim sum, and six baskets will get you one premium dimsum basket. You can treat the dim sums as a complete meal or as a starter and order an oriental meal in a bowl after that, but to do so would be to somewhat miss the point.

The two finest dim sums of my meal were scallop suimai with sturgeon caviar (Rs 700) and almond prawns with wasabi mayo (Rs 500). The first was served in a Chinese soup spoon: all you had to do was ladle it into your mouth. There was enough scallop used in the filling to justify the name, but the 'caviar' was anything but! Almond prawns had been thinly coated with a batter to keep the whole thing crisp. There was a touch of wasabi and the almond slices were razor thin and added texture to the morsels. It is not easy to steam a chicken glutinous rice lotus parcel and get the rice whole, while imbuing it with the flavour of the lotus leaf. Usually the rice becomes gooey (a cardinal sin) and the lotus leaf just forms a flavourless wrap. The restaurant has one of the finest versions I have tried in a long time. Similarly, do not miss the playboy dim sum. The corny name is because the dumpling is shaped like a bunny rabbit, ears and all. Inside, a juicy morsel of prawn and enoki mushroom add texture and flavour.

For those who like their dim sum deep-fried, fear not. There are options that underline the point that the management has been hard at work trying to do something different and unique. I liked the concept of the chimichanga roll: diced vegetables in a cheese sauce wrapped in a wheat wrapper and deep-fried. Chicken sui cot is a quaintly pear-shaped dimsum with a potato coating on the chicken filling that has been deep-fried.

Updated about 9hrs ago

  • Food
  • 60% Complete (success)
  • Service
  • 60% Complete (success)
  • Decor
  • 60% Complete (success)

Out of the Box has vibrant interiors, funky furniture and a cool ambience in its Khan Market outlet. This contrasts with the Hauz Khas Village which has a muted décor and a laid-back charm. The former has definitely more energy about it, or a lot of Yuppie yaars (read college kids high on hookahs!). The menu is high on fusion fare with Chicken Tikka and Chilli Chicken Dumplings, Paneer Tikka and Lamb Keema Pizza and Focaccia Bhaji! For dessert try Blueberry Cheesecake, Apple Tart or Tiramisu. The food and beverage selection makes the eatery a hotspot for youngsters without burning a hole in their pocket..

Critic Review

Nightlife Review

Buzz: 3.5/5 | Décor: 3/5

-By Deepali Gupta

The fail safe bar in Hauz Khas Village since TLR has opened and shut twice within a year, OTB (as it's popularly known as) stays true to its name and attempts some unconventional things — from a genre free music policy that plays rock, Techno and Latino to a multi-cuisine menu spanning seven countries, all of which is dishes out on three floors with distinct identities. The Hauz Khas outlet is more active on the gig scene and is also a better looking and more buzzing location, while the recently revamped Khan Market outlet is full of teenyboppers and lovers of cheap booze. Run by a seasoned hospitality company that is managing multiple café-bars, restro-bars and restaurants, it's not surprising that their bar and kitchen are both looked after well. From Mojitos, Margaritas to LITTs, their cocktails are fast movers, but patrons also flock here for their VFM deals on spirits and beers. The eats range from Lebanese to Italian, Thai to Japanese, Chinese to Indian and they do decent dim sums, Bunny Chow, Ludhiana Tandoori Chicken and Keema Pav. Drop by on weekends to catch eclectic live
performances and gigs.
HAPPY HOURS: Noon to 9pm

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