Featured Restaurants in Delhi/NCR

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Critic's Review

Updated 8 minutes ago

  • Food
  • 60% Complete (success)
  • Service
  • 70% Complete (success)
  • Decor
  • 70% Complete (success)

It could easily be the finest Mughlai restaurant in the city.

Atmospherics:

Built on three floors, Lahori Gate has more in common with a family drawing room than an impersonal restaurant. The furniture, the accessories are the kind that you’re likely to find in your favourite aunt’s house. There’s no lift, so if there are elderly people with you, do specify that you’d like the only table on the ground floor. In addition to the first floor, the second floor is where the (open) terrace is. There is plenty for vegetarians, a few (reportedly excellent) choices in Amritsari food, but Lahori Gate is about Mughlai food. It is owned and run by a mother-son combine and most of the recipes are their family ones.

Table Talk:

The one bugbear is the consistency. I have visited Lahori Gate three times and have had such widely differing experiences that I hesitate to offer a firm opinion. When the Shami Kebab (Rs 500) is good, it is insanely brilliant. When it is not good, it is very ordinary. A better bet is the Chapli Kebab. It’s not listed on the menu but the service staff suggests it and it is an unusual choice, heavily seasoned with coarsely chopped onions, green chillies, ginger, garlic and coriander leaves. The mince is coarse and the edges are as intentionally misshapen as they would be in a dhaba in Lahore. You’ll have better luck with the main course offerings. Lahori Murgh Cholley (Rs 490) is an unmissable combination that you’ll not find elsewhere in the city. Tadkewala Peelee Dal (Rs 300) is thick, the grains of dal are cooked almost to the point of disintegration and the robust tempering makes it an attractive alternative to the cliched maa ki dal. Even Dal Gosht (Rs 550) is a staple offering in Muslim households across Delhi 6 which never makes its way into restaurant menus, being considered too homely to serve to customers. The one dish that has never let me down is Peshawari Keema (Rs 475). Surprisingly pale in colour and minced by hand rather than in a mincer, it is cooked with just enough gravy as to be eaten with a roti.

Plus and Minus:

The service staff are the most eager to please in the restaurant industry. The kitchen needs to work with more consistency.

Must Try:

Zaffrani Gosht Dum Biryani, Paneer Khurchan, Murgh Makhni Khas

Critic reviews are anonymous and all bills are paid by them.

Updated 12 minutes ago

  • Food
  • 60% Complete (success)
  • Service
  • 0% Complete (success)
  • Decor
  • 60% Complete (success)

Cocoberry is quite a popular name and was the first one to do frozen yoghurts in our city. Some of the outlets appear to have seen better days. All the flavours of the frozen yoghurts seem to be artificial. The flavours are rather overpowering in themselves and don't combine very easily with the toppings: Blueberry, green apple and strawberry are the fruit flavours. Toppings include a variety of jellies, chopped fruits and chocolate sprinkles, but the turnover being rather low, the toppings appear unappealing and not particularly fresh. The staff members across outlets are clueless. Ask them about just about any combination on the menu and all you will get is blank looks. It could so easily have been a hip place for cool treats, but it has degenerated rather rapidly. Sad.rn

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