Featured Restaurants in Kolkata

Trusted Reviewers

Critic's Review

Updated this week

  • Food
  • 50% Complete (success)
  • Service
  • 60% Complete (success)
  • Decor
  • 60% Complete (success)

Restauranting has entered a new era in this part of the world. It is more about attitude and experiences, rather than what comes to the table! Amongst the hustle and bustle of oceanic offerings in the city, has sprung up Codfather - a fish and chips place to meet the demands of Gen XYZ. Modelled on the fish and chips joints back in good ol' England, this one definitely reflects the attitude of its 20-something owner who returned home from the UK with ample food exposure, or so he claims. However, good restaurants are much more than just attitude...and Codfather has miles to go.

Decor

There is no pier here or no water to be seen. In a sleepy bye lane of south Kolkata, this restaurant has a casual set-up of canary yellow and electric blue metal chairs, distressed wood furniture, shoals of fish on the walls and colourful glass hookahs. A peek into the see through steel kitchen adds to its modernity, but the chalk and black board day's special goes classic. And if the season permits, one can even use the pretty slice of patio seating.

Food

The menu is particularly focussed! Needless to say, we don't expect much beyond fishes and decide on: Jacket Potato with Cheese (Rs. 170), Aioli Prawn (Rs. 435), Codfather Special Soup (Rs.175), Battered Fish (beer batter) (Rs.390, medium), Farm House Chicken Pie (Rs. 455), Fish Pâté (Rs.365) and Bake Aubergine (Rs.335).

Plus & Minus

The chunky Jacket potato makes a surprise entry, smooth and grainy, just with an ordinary smear of cheesy sauce. The special soup is nothing clear, rather high on cornflour, crammed with veggies with a salty pop of stringy cheese now and then. The succulent prawns of the Aioli Prawns keep the tastebuds happy, but is drowned in an overtly generous creamy sauce, yet again! The premier battered fish is a single fillet Kolkata Beckti, with a slight after taste. And though the batter does not look particularly reassuring and is a little oily in parts, there is plenty of crunch. And this comes with a bunch of old fashioned hand-cut chips, thank God. The fish pâté is flaked fresh with cream and served on toast. The Bake Aubergine is a mishmash, thin slices of aubergine on a thick blanket of mash, tangy tomato concasse and can't-have-any-more creamy sauce. Finally, the Chicken Pie is the kind of comfort food we like digging into. Beyond the gratin of mashed potatoes, we find a huddle of tasty chicken bits, peppery to the palate.

Critic reviews are anonymous and all bills are paid by TimesCity.

Updated this week

  • Food
  • 60% Complete (success)
  • Service
  • 60% Complete (success)
  • Decor
  • 50% Complete (success)

The best way to really get under the skin of a cuisine is to immerse into the culture it is coming from. It is actually a local amalgamation of people, sharing of regional recipes and cooking techniques that create a cuisine unique to a particular city. Bombay Brasserie carries the legacy of Bombay culture and such a distinctive cuisine with it. It transports the taste of the real Bombay through a restaurant, which has artfully transformed authentic Indian flavours into a contemporary gourmet experience. New in Kolkata, this franchisee operation in a posh mall attracts us to this culinary journey.

Decor

A classic glasshouse décor describes the space best. A largish, open dining hall, with high ceilings, antique-feel cage lighting, modern comfortable seating with marble tables, sums it up. The restaurant highlights an enclosed, brighter private dining area, with wall mounted seating, clustered vignettes of India through framed photographs and an industrial show kitchen at the other end, specifically dedicated to the art-form of Indian bread making. However, we absolutely abhor the fact of nannies babysitting toddlers through the maze of tables throughout our meal and strollers being whizzed around tables to access the rest rooms!

Food

The smart faux leather cerulean blue menu, though already falling apart from the binding, adds some colour to the evening, The inside reflects a pictorial description with some exciting influences of Parsi, Malvani, Konkani, Irani and Awadhi cuisines. We decide on Prawn Koliwada (Rs.410), Lohe Ki Kadhai Ke Aloo (Rs.270), Salli Chicken (Rs.430), Bombay Kheema Masala (Rs.430), Nawabi Gosht Biryani (Rs.450), Chur Chur Paratha (Rs.95), Kala Khatta (Rs.175).

Plus & Minus

The Koliwada fisher-folk recipe of marinated prawns does not disappoint – crisp outside and moist inside, it gives distinct bites of carom seeds or ajwain. The Punjabi Lohe ki Kadhai ke Aloo, with baby potatoes leaves the aftertaste of the smoky iron-wok cooked spices, stir-fried till the moisture evaporates; sharpening the tang of spices alright, but the quality of baby potatoes itself leaves a question in the mind. The Parsi influenced Salli Chicken is ordinary, comes in a thick and creamy tomato gravy, swollen with diced pieces of tender chicken, topped with a sprinkling of fried potato sticks. The Chur Chur paratha is flaky, light and powdered with spices on top and is a perfect accompaniment to dinner.

My dish of choice, is the Irani flavoured Kheema Masala, a fine mutton mince, radiant with flavors and served with soft pao or bread. The unsealing of the dum Gosht Biryani, unravels an aromatic splendour, but turns out to be a mundane fare. The Kala Khatta gola or ice candy, adds a rustic touch and works out as a perfect sorbet, while the Amritsari Kulfa (Rs.220) with rabdi and falooda makes a dramatic entry on a bed of dry ice to sweeten our palate.

Critic reviews are anonymous and all bills are paid by TimesCity.

Get the Weekend planner &
discover the best in your city.